1974 vs. 2011-2013 Tornados, Weather-Related Natural Disasters, and Death Numbers: Politically, Watergate vs. What?

In the process of organizing

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3402/3597666224_8081051325_z.jpg?zz=1

2011“devastating winter blizzard in the Midwest, Hurricane Irene on the East Coast and a massive drought across the South, and 2011 becomes one of the worst year’s for natural disaster in United States history.”

2012 – “The United States, in particular, was seriously affected by weather extremes in 2012, accounting for 69 percent of total global disaster losses. 2012 saw 905 natural catastrophes worldwide, pushing total disaster-related losses to $170 billion. While global loss was “moderate” — compared with 2011’s record $380 billion — it represented the second-costliest year for the United States, after 2005 when Hurricane Katrina hit.

“Some two-thirds of the global overall losses and 92 percent of the insured losses in 2012 were due to weather-related events in the United States.

Superstorm Sandy, the Summer-Long Drought in the Midwest, Hurricane Irene, and Severe Storms and Tornados accounted for more than $100 billion of worldwide losses. Of this, $58 billion was covered by the insurance industry.

The drought alone cost the country more than $20 billion.

2013 – Boston Marathon Bombings, Texas Waco Plant Explosion, Oklahoma Tornados of May 20, 31, 2013.

****

it is interesting. Yesterday, i got Time magazine of June 3, 2013. This issue features the story of the Oklahoma tornado, which i have the impression that the reporters covered it in rather clumsy manner, which mainly focused on individual personal stories, but lacked any detailed satistics of weather-related disasters of recent years.

          One thing particular about this Time Report is, it provides a small graph that shows the number of death by Tornados during the period of 1972-2013 (but it doesn’t show the number of tornados occurred; it only shows the total number of death by whatever number of tornados happened in particular year; what kind of clumsy graph is this? and this is a small graph on top of the page. In the main text of the Time article, the reporters even don’t mention or explain the graph at all, neither mention any statistics of tornados or natural weather-related disasters.; and the average tornado-warning lead time). 

          In this graph, however, i found one striking pattern. This graph showed two specific years that showed the highest Tornators-related human death:

1974 (366 Death)

How many tornators in US? : The Year of Watergate Scandal; what else other disasters? ); 1974 fires‎ (3 P); 1974 health disasters‎ (1 P); 1974 natural disasters‎ (6 C, 2 P); Terrorist incidents in 1974‎ (20 P); Transport disasters in 1974‎ (4 C); Bangladesh famine of 1974

 

2011 (Highest Deaths of 553)

How many tornators in US this year?: What was politically happening in this year? It was the year……;

Personally, this year, especially around May through August, ex’s beating on me had been escalating to fatal levels; why this Time article only deal with tornadors? why not summarize other disasters also? it reports like nothing else but this tornador is trouble, minimizing weather-related disasters of recent a few years.; what else other disasters in recent years?).    

According to Wikipedia:

1974 - 945 Tornados, 366 death; The Super Outbreak: April 25–28, 2011 tornado outbreak. It was also the most violent tornado outbreak ever recorded, with 30 F4/F5 tornadoes reported. From April 3 to April 4, 1974, there were 148 tornadoes confirmed in 13 U.S. states, including Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, and New York; and the Canadian province of Ontario. It extensively damaged approximately 900 square miles (2,330 square kilometers) along a total combined path length of 2,600 miles (4,200 km): A death toll of over 300.

2011 Weather-Related Disasters

(A) There were 1,897 tornadoes reported in the US in 2011 (of which 1,704 were confirmed). 2011 was an exceptionally destructive and deadly year for tornadoes; worldwide, at least 577 people perished due to tornadoes: 12 in Bangladesh, two in South Africa, one in New Zealand, one in the Philippines, one in Russia, one in Canada, and an estimated 553 in the United States (compared to 564 US deaths in the prior ten years combined).Due mostly to several extremely large tornado outbreaks in the middle and end of April and in late May, the year finished well above average in almost every category, with six EF5 tornadoes and nearly enough total tornado reports to eclipse the mark of 1,817 tornadoes recorded in 2004, the current record year for total number of tornadoes. 553 confirmed fatalities is also the second-most tornadic deaths in a single year for tornadoes in US history. This total is due in large part to the 325 tornadic deaths that occurred during the April 25–28, 2011 tornado outbreak across the Southeastern United States and the 158 tornadic deaths in the 2011 Joplin tornado.

(B) Top 5 worst natural disasters of 2011

From Japan to the United States, it was another bad year for natural disasters. As far as natural disasters are concerned, it would be difficult to experience a year worse than 2010. With a string of devastating earthquakes in Haiti and Chile, and then several massive volcanic eruptions in Iceland and Indonesia, along with the usual flooding, landslides and tropical storms, many people wrote around this time last year that 2010 was a year defined by disasters. Well, while 2011 might be better defined by protests, it did its best to live up to 2010’s natural havoc as mother nature continued its apparent retaliation against man from Japan to Africa to the United States. Here’s a look at some of the most-severe natural calamities to strike in 2011.

1) Earthquake in Japan — Talk about a butterfly effect. The 8.9-magnitude earthquake — one the strongest earthquakes ever recorded — that struck off of Japan’s coast on March 11 would have been the year’s worst disaster by itself. But it was the tsunami it triggered that would cause the most lasting damage. The surge of water reached 30 feet high and traveled more than three miles inland. More than 15,000 people were killed by the earthquake and subsequent tsunami. But it is the nuclear meltdown that the tsunami caused that everyone is talking about and will likely be talking about for years to come. Some think the world could ultimately come to view Fukushima as being worse than Chernobyl. 2) Drought in East Africa — A widespread drought across Kenya, Somalia, Ethiopia, Eritrea and Djibouti over the summer laid waste to food and water supplies across the region, sparking the worst famine in decades. Somalia, already a failed state at the best of times, was the hardest hit. An armed conflict with Al Shabaab, the local offshoot of Al Qaeda, only exacerbated the problem. The famine worsened in September as the United Nations reported that half the country was in need of emergency aid. It now estimates that as many as 30,000 children have died as a result. 3) Floods in Thailand — Thailand suffered through the worst flooding in half a century this year, inundating large swathes of Bangkok, its densely populated capital. The waters first began to rise in July, and the flooding continued through December. Thai officials say that about 800 people have been killed as a result of the floods, but some suggest that number is likely higher. More than 12 million people were affected and the financial cost has been astronomical. The World Bank reported this month that damages could reach as high as $45 billion — making it one of the costliest disasters in recent history. 4) Typhoon in the Philippines — Tropical Storm Washi might be the most under-covered natural disaster of 2011, and it just happened. The storm first made landfall on Dec. 16 over Mindanao, the second-largest and easternmost island of the archipelago. It is the site of a long-running separatist conflict, which has complicated rescue efforts. In less than 12 hours, about 8 inches of rain blanketed the region, triggering flash floods and landslides. So far more than 1,200 people have been reported killed as a result, and that number is expected to rise. More than half a million people have lost their homes, according to government officials in the Philippines. 5) Storms in the United States — It’s rare for the United States to make these kinds of lists, with the exception perhaps of Hurricane Katrina in 2005. But it makes the list for 2011 because of a combination of unusual and severe weather events that in total caused the country $35 billion in damages and killed more than 700 people. Numerous tornadoes, flooding, a drought and a blizzard have all combined to at times cripple regions of the United States. On April 27, more than 300 tornadoes — four of those reaching the highest level on the tornado severity scale — ripped through the Southeast, leveling whole towns and killing 321 people. The unprecedented tornado outbreak was quickly followed a month later, on May 22, by another level five tornado in Joplin, Missouri that wiped out the town and killed 158 people. Add to that a

“devastating winter blizzard in the Midwest, Hurricane Irene on the East Coast and a massive drought across the South, and 2011 becomes one of the worst year’s for natural disaster in United States history.”

2012

(A) There were 1,037 tornadoes reported in the U.S. in 2012, of which at least 932 have been confirmed. There between 111 and 113 confirmed fatalities worldwide: 1 in Poland, 1 in Japan, 1 in Italy, 3 in New Zealand, 5 in Indonesia, 6 in Turkey, 26 in Argentina, and 68-70 in the United States.

(B) U.S. Tops List of Natural Disaster Losses for 2012

June 02, 2013; 10:54 AM

Since 1980, geophysical events — such as earthquakes and volcano eruptions — have been more or less stable, while weather-related events — including storms, floods, heat waves and drought — have grown more than threefold.

The United States, in particular, was seriously affected by weather extremes in 2012, accounting for 69 percent of total global disaster losses, a report showed.

According to a new report by risk management group Munich Re, 2012 saw 905 natural catastrophes worldwide, pushing total disaster-related losses to $170 billion. While global loss was “moderate” — compared with 2011’s record $380 billion — it represented the second-costliest year for the United States, after 2005 when Hurricane Katrina hit.

“Some two-thirds of the global overall losses and 92 percent of the insured losses in 2012 were due to weather-related events in the United States,” the report said.

Superstorm Sandy, the Summer-Long Drought in the Midwest, and Severe Storms and Tornados accounted for more than $100 billion of worldwide losses. Of this, $58 billion was covered by the insurance industry.

“With regard to insured losses, a particularly striking feature in the climatological events category was that droughts accounted for 28 percent. This is well above the long-term average of 7 percent [from 1980 to 2011] and was due to the severe drought that primarily afflicted the U.S. Midwest during the year, causing immense agricultural losses,” the company reported.

For the top 15 crop insurance companies in the United States — such as Wells Fargo, QBE, ACE, American Financial Group and Endurance — 2012 was the first time in a decade that crop insurance was a money loser, according to a Reuters report.

The drought alone cost the country more than $20 billion.

The rest of 2012’s overall disaster losses were mainly distributed between the Asia-Pacific region (17 percent) and Europe (13 percent) and less than 1 percent in South America and Africa, the report said.

 

2013

There have been 441 tornadoes reported in the U.S. in 2013 (of which at least 360 have been confirmed). 106 direct tornadic fatalities have been confirmed worldwide in 2013 – 48 in the United States, 31 in Bangladesh, 24 in China, and 3 in Turkey. + Plus May 31 2013 Oklahoma City Tornados

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